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Heat from the Heavens - Opening up the Infrared Sky EMBARGOED UNTIL 9AM (CST) JANUARY 9, 2008

Issued by: Inge Heyer, Science Outreach Specialist
Joint Astronomy Centre
Email: outreach@jach.hawaii.edu
Tel: +1 808 969 6524
Fax: +1 808 961 6516

Images, notes, and contact details appear below.

9 January 2008

Heat from the Heavens - Opening up the Infrared Sky

The infrared sky is expanding significantly for the world astronomical community with the first world release of data (DR1) from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS).

UKIDSS DR1 has mapped a larger volume of the sky than any previous infrared survey. As the UKIDSS project progresses, it will gradually become the dominant source of information about the infrared sky, expanding its volume by a factor of 15 beyond DR1.

For the past two years, the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) in Hawaii has been systematically scanning the heavens for five different "colours" of faint infrared light. This allows astronomers to penetrate dark clouds where stars are currently forming, and to locate stars much less massive and much cooler than the Sun. Furthermore, our own Galaxy (the Milky Way) is transparent to the infrared, making it possible to see all the way to its centre and beyond. And finally, the expansion of the Universe stretches visible light from the most distant (and youngest) galaxies and quasars into the infrared part of the spectrum, and by observing this infrared light we can trace the evolution of galaxies from their youngest members. The first world release of these data makes all this information available to researchers everywhere.

Andy Lawrence from the University of Edinburgh, the UKIDSS Principal Investigator, said "We are moving into new territory. This survey probes huge volumes of space, so that we can locate rare but important objects like the very coolest and least luminous stars and the most distant galaxies. Astronomers in Europe have started getting the science out, but this world release should really unleash the scientific potential of the dataset."

The present release, large though it is, however, is just the beginning. Andy Adamson, Associate Director of UKIRT, says "WFCAM has recently taken its one millionth observation, and the UKIDSS survey is progressing strongly. UKIDSS will have surveyed a volume 15 times larger than the current release, DR1, by the time it is completed in 2012."

Results from this world-leading effort are released in two stages - first to the member nations of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), and 18 months later to the world astronomical community. The data now being released worldwide were obtained in the first, intensive and exciting, WFCAM observing periods on the UKIRT telescope, up to January 2006. There will be new data releases approximately every six months over the coming five years.

Astronomers from the ESO nations have been busily following up on the early UKIDSS data for the past year. The survey has proved itself a rich source of exotic objects, exactly as expected. Steve Warren, the UKIDSS Survey Scientist, highlights the discovery of the coolest known brown dwarf in the Galaxy - ULAS J0034 for short - which, at an absolute temperature only just over twice that of the Earth, is fully 100 degrees cooler than any other known brown dwarf. This is likely one of the closest astronomical objects outside the Solar System, and was discovered in the shallow UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS). UKIDSS is also expected to discover some of the most distant objects known, and it appears to be well on the way to this goal. DR1 includes early data from the Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS), which aims to study the evolution of galaxies when the Universe was a fraction of its current age. This project is extraordinarily ambitious, requiring the telescope to revisit the same square-degree area of sky on hundreds of nights. "A hundred thousand very distant galaxies are detected even in the earliest UDS data, and there is also a 'needle in a haystack' object - a quasar at a redshift just in excess of 6, meaning 12.7 billion light years from Earth," says co-discoverer Ross McLure. "The light we now see from this object is very, very old, having set off on its journey to the telescope only a billion years after the big bang."

The first world release also contains large amounts of data on the Milky Way, with millions of stars, young stars and other objects seen clearly through the thick veils of dust which block the Milky Way to visible light, as illustrated in the accompanying images. Phil Lucas, head of the Galactic Plane Survey (GPS), notes that "in terms of detected objects, the GPS dominates UKIDSS, with hundreds of millions of infrared stars in DR1 and many times that still to come. And with the science archive now hosting a large-scale image of the GPS so far, we're able to visualize the infrared Milky Way better than ever before."

These results are among the motivations for carrying out surveys of the infrared sky. Comprising five separate surveys, some of which are highlighted here, UKIDSS has now scoured a larger volume of the Universe than any previous sky survey, and only slightly less than the largest visible light surveys. When the observations are completed in 2012, UKIDSS will have probed some 70 times deeper on average than the previous largest survey.

"The UKIDSS survey programme was expressly designed to capitalise on the unique technical capabilities of the UKIRT Wide-Field Camera" said Gary Davis, Director of the Joint Astronomy Centre in Hawaii, which operates the UKIRT. WFCAM was developed at the UK Astronomy Technology Centre in Edinburgh at a cost of 5M, and it is now the world's leading infrared panoramic camera. "It is rewarding to see the effort and dedication of a large team of scientists and engineers over many years coming to fruition. The release of DR1 presages the huge impact that UKIRT will make on world astronomy over the next several years by probing deeper into the infrared universe than ever before."

Images from the Wide Field Camera undergo processing at the Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit (CASU), Cambridge, UK, and the science products are transferred to the WFCAM Science Archive operated by the Wide Field Astronomy Unit in the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh. Astronomers from around the world will access the UKIDSS data from the Science Archive, which is bracing for the influx of new users. A small preliminary release, of about 1/4 the size of DR1, has been scrutinized from all over the world since it was opened up in August 2007. Nigel Hambly, the scientist responsible for operation of the Science Archive, says that interest is likely to be intense. "Followup of objects discovered in this data release within the ESO nations has already revealed the power of the UKIDSS survey to turn up unique objects and we expect the world community will want to quickly make the most of the data now becoming available".

Images

A globular cluster observed as part of the UKIDSS DR1 release. The image shows a globular cluster in the constellation of Aquila, about 9,000 light years from Earth.



The image on the left shows a globular cluster about 9,000 light years from Earth in the constellation of Aquila. This image in the visual wavelengths was taken by the Palomar Sky Survey in the 1950s. In comparison, the image on the right shows the same area in the infrared, taken as part of the UKIDSS DR1 release. The infrared image reveals the presence and the structure of a globular cluster of stars, first seen by the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is about 6 light years across with a mass of 300,000 suns. The brightness of the stars varies dramatically between the visible and infrared wavelengths due to interstellar extinction.



Field IRAS 20376 observed as part of a future UKIDSS public release. The image shows the structure of an HII region in the constellation of Cygnus, about 5,500 light years from Earth.



The image on the left shows a region called IRAS 20376 about 5,500 light years from Earth in the constellation of Cygnus. This image in the visual wavelengths was taken by the Second Digital Sky Survey in the 1980s. In comparison, the image on the right shows the same area in the infrared, taken as part of a future UKIDSS public release. The infrared image reveals the presence and the structure of an HII starforming region.



The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.



The Wide Field Camera (long black tube) on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii.



Notes for Editors

Light Year

One light year is about 10 million million kilometres or 6 million million miles.

Infrared Light

  • Infrared wavelengths are longer wavelengths than light waves. They are typically measured in microns, also called micrometres. One micron is one millionth of a metre, one 10000th of a centimetre, or one 25000th of an inch.

    Brown Dwarf

    A brown dwarf is a small, faint, cool object (often called "failed" star) that, unlike the Sun and other stars, does not have sufficient mass to achieve hydrogen fusion in its core. Brown dwarfs exist in the mass range between about ten times that of Jupiter and one-twelfth the Sun's mass. Most of their radiation is in the infrared, and therefore is not detectable to either the human eye or conventional optical detectors. Detectors sensitive to longer infrared wavelengths, such as those used at UKIRT, are capable of observing these objects in unique ways.

    Quasar

    The word "quasar" comes originally from "quasi-stellar radio source," describing objects as bright as stars but at extragalactic distances. Today we understand that quasars are the ultraluminous centers of distant galaxies likely powered by supermassive black holes.

    WFCAM

    The Wide-Field Camera (WFCAM) was delivered to UKIRT in late 2004 and has been in active operation since Spring 2005. In two years of operation - sharing the telescope about equally with other observing modes - WFCAM has taken 30 times the amount of data taken in the entire 25-year history of the telescope before its arrival.

    UKIRT

    The world's largest telescope dedicated solely to infrared astronomy, the 3.8-metre (12.5-foot) UK Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) is sited near the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, at an altitude of 4194 metres (13760 feet) above sea level. It is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre in Hilo, Hawaii, on behalf of the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council. More about the UK Infrared Telescope: http://outreach.jach.hawaii.edu/articles/aboutukirt/

    The UK ATC

    The UK Astronomy Technology Centre is located at the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (ROE). It is a scientific site belonging to the Science and Technology Facilities Council. The mission of the UK ATC is to support the mission and strategic aims of the Science and Technology Facilities Council and to help keep the UK at the forefront of world astronomy by providing a UK focus for the design, production and promotion of state of the art astronomical technology.

    Science and Technology Facilities Council

    The Science and Technology Facilities Council is an independent, non-departmental public body of the Office of Science and Innovation which itself is part of the Department of Innovation, Universities and Skills. It was formed as a new Research Council on 1 April 2007 through a merger of the Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils (CCLRC) and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) and the transfer of responsibility for nuclear physics from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). We are one of seven national research councils in the UK. The Science and Technology Facilities Council is government funded and provides research grants and studentships to scientists in British universities, gives researchers access to world-class facilities and funds the UK membership of international bodies such as the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, CERN, the European Space Agency and the European Southern Observatory. It also contributes money for the UK telescopes overseas on La Palma, Hawaii, Australia and in Chile, the UK Astronomy Technology Centre at the Royal Observatory, Edinburgh and the MERLIN/VLBI National Facility.

    Contacts

    Please note that it is best to contact these individuals by email.
    • Inge Heyer, Science Outreach Specialist
      Joint Astronomy Centre
      Email: outreach@jach.hawaii.edu
      Tel: +1 808 969 6524
      Fax: +1 808 961 6516
    • Julia Maddock, Community Press Officer
      Science and Technology Facilities Council
      Tel: +44 (0)1793 442094
      Fax: +44 (0)1793 442002
      Email: julia.maddock@stfc.ac.uk

    Science Contacts

    Please note that it is best to contact these individuals by email.
    • Prof. Steve Warren
      Astrophysics Group
      Imperial College London
      Email: s.j.warren@ic.ac.uk
    • Prof. Gary Davis
      Joint Astronomy Centre
      Desk: 808 969 6504
      Email: g.davis@jach.hawaii.edu
    • Dr. Andy Adamson
      Joint Astronomy Centre
      Desk: 808 969 6511
      Email: a.adamson@jach.hawaii.edu
    • Prof. Andy Lawrence
      Regius Professor of Astronomy and Head of School of Physics
      The University of Edinburgh
      Email: al@roe.ac.uk

    Web links

    UKIDSS Home
    http://www.ukidss.org/
    GPS Mosaic
    http://www.ukidss.org/surveys/surveys.html/
    Joint Astronomy Centre - UKIRT
    http://www.jach.hawaii.edu/UKIRT/
    Joint Astronomy Centre - UKIRT - WFCAM
    http://www.jach.hawaii.edu/UKIRT/instruments/wfcam/
    European Southern Observatory (ESO)
    http://www.eso.org/public/
    Joint Astronomy Centre public outreach site
    http://outreach.jach.hawaii.edu/
    United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre
    http://www.roe.ac.uk/atc/
    Science and Technology Facilities Council
    http://www.stfc.ac.uk/
    This press release
    http://outreach.jach.hawaii.edu/pressroom/2008_ukidss_dr1/
  • Contact: JAC outreach. Updated: Tue Mar 24 13:18:36 HST 2009

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